A maior rede de estudos do Brasil

Grátis
25 pág.
JACKSON, Kenneth David. Waiting for Pessoa´s Ancient Mariner

Pré-visualização | Página 4 de 10

was like­
wise  a  key  ingredient  of  symbolist  theater  of  the  fi n­de­siècle.  If  the  goal  of 
Maeterlinck’s theater, as gleaned by Arthur Symons (1865–1945),17 is to reveal the 
“strangeness, pity, and beauty” of the soul, the signifi cance of mystery in life and art, 
and  to give voice  to  the silence of mysticism,  then Pessoa’s objective  is  to  recast 
Maeterlinck’s theater of interior meditation into its adverse through his own enigma 
variations. Pessoa’s “variations” on an enigmatic theme of absence and suspended 
animation,  are  meant  to  carry  the  sense  of  paradox  and  contradiction  to  its  most 
remote by questioning existence. Symons fi nds in Maeterlinck “a drama founded on 
philosophical ideas, apprehended emotionally”; Pessoa, to the contrary, founds his 
drama on emotion apprehended philosophically, at times exclusively by the intellect. 
44 ADVERSE GENRES IN FERNANDO PESSOA
The Axel of his play is the imagined absent mariner, whose return is expected and 
awaited by  the  three women watchers  in  the early morning hours. His purpose  is 
ontological argument rather than dramatic feeling. The play maintains the childlike 
simplicity and imagination of women astonished by their own unawareness, yet who 
face the horror revealed verbally by their uncertainties about reality. The dead damsel 
in the coffi n represents the question of the meaning of life and the “terrifying eternity 
of the things about us,” which Symons places at the heart of mysticism.18 The choice 
of  women  for  the  role  of  communication  with  the  beyond  is  again  supported  by 
Maeterlinck, who attributes to them a special affi nity with the occult, the capacity to 
experience at a deeper level than a man, and considers that they have a special rela­
tionship with the infi nite:  “For women are indeed the veiled sisters of all the great 
things we do not see. They are indeed nearest of kin to the infi nite that is about us” 
(1925:108) / Elles sont vraiment les soeurs voilées de toutes les grandes chose qu’on 
ne voit pas. Elles sont vraiment les plus proches parentes de l’infi ni que nous entoure 
(1986: 59). The three watchers confront silence, emptiness, and nothingness; while 
waiting for the mariner who never appears, they raise doubts about who they are and 
even whether they actually exist. The crux of their ontological crisis lies in the reali­
zation that intellectual consciousness comes about only after the formative experi­
ences and ideals on which it can refl ect are but past, lyrical reminiscences, should 
they have any basis in reality at all; in the paradox, Ricardo Sternberg perceives a 
source of Pessoa’s heteronymic world,19 yet there is a much darker strain that would 
dissolve any positive identity, founded on the present moment, into a revolving and 
irresolvable paradox of time and memory. When the second watcher offers to tell her 
dream, the fi rst affi rms the pleasure and supremacy of potentiality over memory: “If 
it’s beautiful, I’m already sorry I’ll have heard it” (Se é belo, tenho já pena de vir a 
atê­lo outvido).
While Lopes muses that The Mariner is perhaps the play that the French sym­
bolists imagined but were never able to write themselves (esse drama estático que 
os  simbolistas  franceses  imaginaram sem conseguirem, contudo,  realizar),20 Pes­
soa’s idea is much more radical; he borrows Maeterlinck’s theory of static theater as 
a foundation on which  to create a different  theater of  immanence. Pessoa’s  three 
damsels  imagine an existence beyond  the empty, circular castle and confront  the 
horror of knowing the truth about how distant their consciousness lies from reality, 
should  it  even  exist  at  all.  Present  time  is  likewise  denied  its  validity,  since  any 
words spoken are already in the past: “My present words, as soon as I have spoken 
them, will belong immediately to the past, they’ll be somewhere outside of me, rigid 
and fatal” (As minhas palavras presentes, mal eu as diga, pertencerão logo ao pas­
sado, fi carão fora de mim, não sei onde, rígidas e fatais). The women seem to know 
their fates are sealed: “It’s always too late to sing, just as it’s always too late not to 
sing” (É sempre tarde demais para cantar, assim como é sempre tarde demais para 
não cantar). Their doubts yield to desperation and fi nally resignation, in what Lopes 
describes as a “theater of ecstasy.”21 With The Mariner, Pessoa pushes static theater 
as tragic drama over an abyss; using techniques of myth and ritual with a medieval 
aura so particular to Portugal’s own historical formation, his play disarticulates the 
interior  voice  of  the  self  from  its  own  consciousness,  questions  the  meaning  of 
enunciations or dialogue, and dissolves any certainty about either  the characters’ 
WAITING FOR PESSOA’S ANCIENT MARINER 45
existence or external reality. In his own terms, Pessoa closes all windows and doors 
on reality. The drama is made of existential doubt rather than psychological or emo­
tional; it is, in Eduardo Lourenço’s phrase, a negative ontological adventure. Virtual 
states of being both substitute and produce the perceived real, as the three characters 
oscillate from mental states of fatal ennui to dreamlike states of tantalizing mystery, 
while watching over the dead maiden and awaiting the absent mariner. 
A Wake or a Sleep? Latency, Immanence, 
Presentiment
The discourse of the three women is located in an ephemeral space between waking 
and sleeping, where “what sleepiness, what sleep clouds my way of looking at things” 
(Que sono, que sono que absorve o meu modo de olhar para as coisas) is equated 
with time past, from which the speakers are afraid to awake. Like amnesiacs, they 
struggle to remember the past, yet tremble at the actual possibility that they might 
remember what it was: “But it was something huge and frightening like the existence 
of God” (Mas foi qualquer coisa de grande e pavoroso como o haver Deus). If they 
lose their memory of the past, they are no longer themselves, and their past becomes 
someone else’s,  and  is  as  if  it  never  existed  for  them: “And  then, my whole past 
becomes another, and I cry for  the dead  life  that  I carry with me and that  I never 
lived” (E depois todo o meu passado torna­se outro e eu choro uma vida morta que 
trago comigo e que não vivi nunca). Even the women who remember are left to won­
der whether their memories are their own or have come from some other life: “Who 
knows [. . .] whether I was the one who lived what I remember?” (Quem sabe [. . .] 
se  fui eu que vivi o que recordo?). These presentiments are conveyed  in  torturing 
expressionism. They hear  themselves screaming on the inside,  they feel a burning 
need  to be afraid,  they no  longer  recognize  their own voices,  it  is as  if  they were 
watching themselves helplessly from the outside: “My consciousness fl oats on the 
surface  of  the  terrifi ed  somnolence  of  my  sensations  through  my  skin”  (A  minha 
consciência  bóia  à  tona  da  sonolência  apavorada  dos  meus  sentidos  pela  minha 
pele).  They sense the presence of a horror that is separating them from their souls 
and thoughts: “Who is the fi fth person in this room who holds up an arm and stops us 
every time we’re about to feel?” (Quem é a quinta pessoa neste quarto que estende 
o braço e nos interrompe sempre que vamos a sentir?). Meaning splinters and strat­
ifi es, as if the speaker, word, and sound had separate individual identities: “And it 
seemed to me that you, and your voice, and the meaning of what you were saying 
were three different beings, like three creatures who walk and talk” (E parecia­me 
que vós, e a vossa voz, e o sentido do que dizieis eram três entes diferentes, como três 
criaturas que falam e andam). The entrapment they sense before the impossibility of 
knowing or feeling