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clients.
A variety of subjects and styles are welcome, so 
let your creative energy shine on the canvas and 
enter today!
Early-Bird Deadline 
February 1, 2019
For more information and to enter, visit 
artistsnetwork.com/art-competitions/acrylic-works
acrylicworks7
Color & Light
CALL FOR ENTRIES
Emeralds, Pamela Edevold
Iris-Messenger of the Gods, Kitty Kelly
For over 25 years, The Great Courses has brought the world’s 
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How to Look at and 
Understand Great Art
Taught by Professor Sharon Latchaw Hirsh
ROSEMONT COLLEGE
LECTURE TITLES
1. The Importance of First Impressions
2. Where Am I? Point of View and Focal Point
3. Color—Description, Symbol, and More
4. Line—Description and Expression
5. Space, Shape, Shade, and Shadow
6. Seeing the Big Picture—Composition
7. The Illusion—Getting the Right Perspective
8. Art That Moves Us—Time and Motion
9. Feeling with Our Eyes—Texture and Light
10. Drawing—Dry, Liquid, and Modern Media
11. Printmaking—Relief and Intaglio
12. Modern Printmaking—Planographic
13. Sculpture—Salt Cellars to Monuments
14. Development of Painting—Tempera and Oils
15. Modern Painting—Acrylics and Assemblages
16. Subject Matters
17. Signs—Symbols, Icons, and Indexes in Art
18. Portraits—How Artists See Others
19. Self-Portraits—How Artists See Themselves
20. Landscapes—Art of the Great Outdoors
21. Putting It All Together
22. Early Renaissance—Humanism Emergent
23. Northern Renaissance—Devil in the Details
24. High Renaissance—Humanism Perfected
25. Mannerism and Baroque—Distortion and Drama
26. Going Baroque—North versus South
27. 18th-Century Reality and Decorative Rococo
28. Revolutions—Neoclassicism and Romanticism
29. From Realism to Impressionism
30. Postimpressionism—Form and Content 
Re-Viewed
31. Expressionism—Empathy and Emotion
32. Cubism—An Experiment in Form
33. Abstraction/Modernism—New Visual Language
34. Dada Found Objects/Surreal Doodles
and Dreams
35. Postmodernism—Focus on the Viewer
36. Your Next Museum Visit—Do It Yourself!
How to Look at and Understand Great Art
Course no. 7640 | 36 lectures (30 minutes/lecture)
Discover How to Look 
at and Understand Art
Few endeavors equal the power of great artwork to capture beauty, 
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Expert art historian and professor Sharon Latchaw Hirsh gives you 
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Understand Great Art. Her 36 lectures are an in-depth exploration of 
the practical skill of viewing art through the lenses of line, perspective, 
and other elements. Using more than 900 timeless masterpieces of 
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majesty of great art.
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18 Watercolor artist | OCTOBER 2018
/ KRIS PARINS /
WELCOME AN
OUTSIDE INFLUENCE
I ind there’s nothing quite like a get-together with
artist friends to cure creative doldrums. Getting
out of the studio to spend a few hours laughing,
sharing enthusiasm and new opportunities, and
giving and getting advice provides a break from
the myopia that can happen after too many days
without some kind of outside inluence.
My artist friends and I may share images of
our work in progress, or just talk. Receiving
encouragement feels wonderful, but it’s also
uplifting to be able to ofer that kind of boost to
a friend who’s feeling some insecurity about his
or her work.
Whether it’s a lunch out, a brown-bag critique,
a local art club meeting, or an artist’s reception,
I come back to my studio feeling refreshed, ener-
gized and ready to get back to work.
Kris Parins values her outings with artist friends as a way to produce 
not only laughter but also new ideas and inspiration. Pictured from 
left to right: Karen Knutson, Anne Abgott, Parins and Roger Parent.
creative
fire
stoking the
WHETHER IT’S A CREATIVE RUT OR FULL-
BLOWN BLOCK, ONE OF THE BIGGEST 
CHALLENGES FOR ARTISTS CAN BE 
SUSTAINING MOTIVATION AND KEEPING 
THE CREATIVE ENGINE HUMMING. HERE, 
FIVE ARTISTS SHARE PRACTICAL TIPS TO 
JUMP-START IDEAS AND KINDLE INSPIRATION.
Compiled by Anne Hevener
ArtistsNetwork.com 19
/ TOM LYNCH /
AN EXERCISE IN 
BLACK AND WHITE
If the standard remedies for beating painter’s block—
visiting a gallery, museum or art fair—don’t help me, 
I’ve found that a simple exercise of working only in 
black and white can jump-start my desire to paint. 
I keep it simple, using a Scratch & Wash pencil (by 
General Pencil). h e graphite dissolves quickly with a 
wet brush, so I’m still “painting,” but I’m forced to focus 
on tone and contrast—to see the world around me in 
terms of shapes and tone, not just things. After exer-
cises like this, I i nd that my subsequent paintings are 
enhanced with better lights and darks. It helps.
Just Get 
Started
We all run into moments 
when we just can’t figure 
out what to paint. I’ve 
found that a “quick-start 
exercise” that simply 
gets me painting can 
trigger inspiration. Here 
are five prompts that I’ve 
put to work successfully 
over the years:
From Gerald Brommer: 
Paint a still life on 
watercolor board using 
only white gesso, cut or 
torn pieces of a brown 
paper bag, and black 
gesso or black gouache.
From Milford Zornes: 
Begin a painting in 
black. Then, use the
first color in your palette, 
mixed with black. Do 
this until you use all your 
paints, with black, in
one painting.
From Millard Sheets: 
Do 20 paintings about 
who you are, and don’t 
be afraid to see the 
changes that take place. 
From me: 
Paint an abstract (try it 
in acrylic) about who 
you are, adding one 
brushstroke a day over 
the course of a month. 
From Jean Auguste 
Dominique Ingres to 
Edgar Degas: 
“Draw lines, young man, 
many lines. From memory 
or from nature—it is in this 
way that you become a 
good artist.”
— Betsy Dillard StroudThis sketch was done in 
a café in Mt. Lebanon, 
Penn., where I was 
waiting for my food 
and inspiration. The 
process energized my 
creative juices.
20 Watercolor artist | OCTOBER 2018
/ CHRIS KRUPINKSI /
PAINT ALL THE TIME
More than 25 years ago, I decided that I 
wanted to be a professional artist. I knew 
I couldn’t make that happen by sketching 
and painting only on the weekends. I under-
stood that I’d have to work hard, so I made a 
commitment to paint for a minimum of two 
hours every day—no matter what. And I did. 
I even carved out time on holidays. When I 
traveled, I’d pack a sketchbook and paints. 
I had a goal, and I was driven.
I learned that working consistently not 
only improved my painting, but also opened 
up my mind to new ideas. Since starting a 
“constant painting” regimen, never once have 
I experienced artist’s block or a shortage of 
ideas. As I’m painting, a new idea—usually 
related to what I’m presently working on—
will begin to take shape. And that cycle just 
keeps going. 
Growth comes with a lot of work. Ideas 
come from the time spent.
/ BETSY DILLARD STROUD /
KEEP AN OPEN MIND
One day as I dawdled about my painting table, which is 
crammed with all kinds of “stuf ,” I went to pieces—not 
literally, but i guratively—as I considered what