A maior rede de estudos do Brasil

Grátis
34 pág.
ENSINO FUNDAMENTAL 9º ANO_INGLÊS_VOLUME 03 (PROFESSOR)

Pré-visualização | Página 5 de 7

uman emissions/carbon footprintp
deforestation
Fl
ap
er
. 2
01
8.
 D
ig
ita
l. 
9o. ano – Volume 320
Part 2
c) How much trouble are we in? 
d) How much will the seas rise? 
Big trouble.
[...] Longer term, if emissions rise unchecked, 
scientists fear climate effects so severe 
that they might destabilize governments, 
produce waves of refugees, precipitate the 
sixth mass extinction of plants and animals 
in the Earth’s history, and melt the polar ice 
caps, causing the seas to rise high enough to 
flood most of the world’s coastal cities. [...]
The real question is how fast.
The ocean has accelerated and is now rising at a rate of about a foot per century, forcing 
governments and property owners to spend tens of billions of dollars fighting coastal erosion. But 
if that rate continued, it would probably be manageable, experts say. The risk is that the rate will 
increase still more. [...]
 3. Read the FAQ about climate change and match the two questions 
in each section with the corresponding answers.
FAQ (frequently asked questions) 
is a list of questions and answers 
related to a particular subject.
Climate Change Is Complex. We’ve Got Answers to Your Questions.
Part 1
a) Climate change? Global warming? What 
do we call it?
b) Could natural factors be the cause of the 
warming?
Nope.
In theory, they could be. If the sun were 
to start putting out more radiation, for 
instance, that would definitely warm the 
Earth. [...] The warming is extremely rapid 
on the geologic time scale, and no other 
factor can explain it as well as human 
emissions of greenhouse gases. [...] 
Both are accurate, but they mean different things.
You can think of global warming as one type of climate change. The broader term covers changes 
beyond warmer temperatures, such as shifting rainfall patterns. [...]
©
Sh
ut
te
rs
to
ck
/2
4N
ov
em
be
rs
©
Sh
ut
te
rs
to
ck
/J
an
 M
ar
tin
 W
ill
What is happening? 
What could happen? 
b
a
c
d
 Língua Inglesa 21
Part 3
e) Does clean energy help or hurt the economy?
f) What can I personally do about it?
Start by sharing this with 50 of your friends.
Experts say the problem can only be solved by large-scale, collective action. [...]
You can also take direct personal action 
to reduce your carbon footprint in 
simple ways that will save you money. 
You can plug leaks in your home 
insulation to save power, install a smart 
thermostat, switch to more efficient 
light bulbs, turn off unused lights, drive 
fewer miles by consolidating trips or 
taking public transit, waste less food, 
and eat less meat.
[...] You can pay attention to company 
policies, support the companies taking 
the lead, and let the others know you 
expect them to do better.
[...] In fact, discussing this issue with your friends and family is one of the most meaningful things 
you can do.
Job growth in renewable energy is strong.
[...] The transition to cleaner energy certainly produces losers, like coal companies, but it also 
creates jobs. The solar industry in the United States now employs more than twice as many 
people as coal mining. [...]
©
Sh
ut
te
rs
to
ck
/L
ow
su
n
GILLIS, Justin. Climate change is complex. We’ve got answers to your questions. Available at: <https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/climate/
what-is-climate-change.html>. Accessed on: 27 Aug. 2018.
 4. The questions are organized in three different sections. Can you match each part with its own heading?
What could happen? What can we do? What is happening?
 1. In small groups, discuss the following questions: 
• What are you and your family doing for a better tomorrow? 
• How do you deal with garbage? Do you separate and recycle? 
• How do you save water/energy? 
• What is your carbon footprint?
 2. How are countries around the world dealing with environmental issues? Research on important 
documents, such as the Paris Agreement, and check how much has been done to prevent or stop 
climate change. Follow your teacher’s instructions and create a fact sheet to share with your classmates.
Caso seja interessante, é possível, neste momento, realizar a atividade 1 da seção Challenge yourself, ao final deste capítulo.
Encaminhamento metodológico.4
What can we do? 
Let’s talk
f
e
9o. ano – Volume 322
Second conditional
 1. Reread this sentence from the Reading time section and complete the rules about the second conditional.
Check it out Encaminhamento metodológico.5
If the sun were to start putting out more radiation, 
for instance, that would definitely warm the Earth.
If-clause (condition), main clause (result)
If + verb ( simple past ), would (’d)/wouldn’t + verb (base form)
 2. After analyzing the example in activity 1, choose the best option to complete the following sentences 
about the use of the second conditional. 
a) We often use it to mention the result of a realistic / an unreal action (it is possible / impossible or 
very difficult to happen). 
b) We use it to talk about possible future actions which are likely / unlikely to happen.
First/Real conditional Second/Unreal conditional
Used for possible situations which are likely to happen.
If I recycle, I’ll help the environment.
(condition in the simple present, result in the future) 
Used for impossible situations which are unlikely to happen.
If everyone recycled, we would save a lot of energy.
(condition in the simple past, result with would)
 3. Match the columns to create conditional sentences. Then, indicate if each one is in the first conditional 
(FC) or in the second conditional (SC).
( FC ) If this drought lasts any longer, 
( SC ) If there were strong earthquakes in Brazil, 
( SC ) Even if we stopped using fossil fuels today,
( FC ) Unless we reduce CO2 emissions, 
• we would need sturdier buildings.
• global warming wouldn’t end immediately.
• it will be very hard to avoid global warming.
• many farmers will be affected.
©
Sh
ut
te
rs
to
ck
/C
ar
to
on
 R
es
ou
rc
e
Enjoy!
When the verb be is in the if-clause of a sentence in the second conditional, we often use the verb form 
were, regardless of the subject.
If I were a scientist, I would create a green fuel to replace fossil fuels.
 Língua Inglesa 23
Ideas factory
What would happen if the weather changed 
drastically? How about if population growth 
suddenly really dropped or spiked? Would 
there be any social or cultural impact? 
Think of these and other concerns related 
to environmental changes and social issues 
and write a short opinion article about your 
predictions. 
You can use the first and the second 
conditional, according to how probable you 
think each situation is. 
Carry out research on the subjects you choose so you can defend your point of view by adding 
quotes and evidences. Remember to analyze and choose reliable sources. Later, exchange texts with a 
classmate and review his/her article.
 1. Match the columns to make predictions.
a) If people ate less meat, 
b) If all companies offered returnable packaging, 
c) If everyone walked to school or work, 
d) If the oceans rose very fast, 
( b ) we would produce less trash.
( d ) many coastal cities would be flooded.
( a ) CO2 emissions could be lower.
( c ) we wouldn’t use so much fuel.
Your turn
Orientação para o uso do material de apoio e sugestão de atividades.6
We usually describe results in the second conditional with would, but other modals that indicate possibility can be used as 
well, such as could and might. 
If Gabi were here, she could teach you about climate change.
 2. Complete these second conditional sentences with the verbs in parentheses in the correct form.
a) If people lived (live) near their workplaces, they would walk (walk) more. 
b) If my family had (have)

Crie agora seu perfil grátis para visualizar sem restrições.