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Search Ads Evaluation General Guidelines

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Search Ads Evaluation General Guidelines
General Guidelines Overview
Introduction
Search ad rating involves interpreting a user query. A user query is the set of keywords that a user enters into the Google search engine. When rating a search ad, perform the following steps:
1. Review the Google search results page, try to understand the user query, and form an opinion about what the user hopes to accomplish by using a search engine.
2. Use the evaluation criteria found in the following instructions to analyze an advertisement and the advertising experience the user will have if he or she clicks on the ad.
User Intent
An understanding of the user intent is necessary to accurately rate a search ad. The user intent is what the user hopes to accomplish by using the Google search engine. Note that users use the search engine to look for a variety things, and there are many user intents.
Some queries are very easy to understand, others are more difficult, and some may seem impossible to understand. Regardless of its meaning, you must research the query and form an opinion about the user intent.
We strongly advise you to review the Google search results page to determine user intent. In order to objectively determine how promising or unpromising an advertiser offering is for a particular user query, it is important to form an opinion about the user intent before beginning an analysis of the advertisement.
Queries & User Intent
Queries with Multiple Meanings
If a query has multiple meanings, please consider that all meanings can be placed on a spectrum between plausible meanings and highly implausible meanings. When analyzing an advertiser offering, consider what meaning the advertiser uses and where it falls along this spectrum. This will help you determine the appropriate search ad rating.
Plausible Meanings
If a query has several plausible meanings, it is important to consider them all. If an advertiser assumes a particular meaning in an ad or on a landing page, and it is a reasonable meaning, assume that is the meaning that the user intended.
Refer to the following example to better understand plausible meanings. For the user query [java], this query could refer to an island, coffee, or a computer language. With no additional information available, it is impossible to say which meaning the user intended. Ads that respond to any of these meanings are acceptable since all three meanings are reasonably plausible.
Possible but Unlikely Meanings
If an ad or landing page assumes a meaning that is possible but not very likely, this is a secondary interpretation. An ad or landing page that addresses only a secondary interpretation of the query is given a lower rating than an ad that addresses a plausible meaning. Use the Secondary Interpretation of Query flag in this case. Generally, rate an ad or landing page that responds to a secondary interpretation negatively.
Refer to the following example to better understand possible but unlikely meanings: For the query [paris], while there are a number of cities called Paris, unless there is some reason to think that one of the smaller cities is meant, a query mentioning Paris is probably referring to Paris, France. So, an ad for hotels in Paris, Texas instead of Paris, France is probably incorrectly comprehending the user intent. Even if the ad is otherwise a good one, rate it on the negative side of the scale and use the Secondary Interpretation of Query flag.
Implausible Meanings
If an ad or landing page assumes a meaning that is completely implausible, treat it as completely wrong and choose a very negative rating. Do not use the Secondary Interpretation of Query flag if the meaning is clearly implausible.
Refer to the following example to better understand implausible meanings. For the User Query [paris], the query probably refers to the city of Paris, France. If an advertiser interprets the meaning to be plaster of paris, it is almost certainly not addressing the user query. Use a very negative rating.
Misspelled Queries
Users often misspell queries. When evaluating a query, if it is clear what the user means, and the misspelled version of the query has no meaning, ignore the misspelling.
Analysis is more difficult if the query appears to be a misspelling, but the misspelled version has a unique meaning. First consider the query as the user entered it, and then consider if it may be misspelled. If advertisers respond to misspellings, ratings may need to be adjusted.
The following are the 4 possible scenarios for Misspelled Queries:
1. Advertiser Responds to Actual Spelling in Query;
2. Advertiser Responds to a Plausible Correction of Spelling in Query;
3. Advertiser Responds to a Possible but Unlikely Correction of Spelling in Query;
4. Implausible Spelling Correction.
Refer to the following example to better understand misspelled queries: User query: [goodnight moom]. There is a famous children’s book called Goodnight Moon. It is very possible that the user means to type [goodnight moon] but types [goodnight moom] instead. However, there is actually a novel titled Goodnight Moom. While the novel is quite obscure, it might be what the user wants.
1 – Advertiser Responds to Actual Spelling in Query
If the advertiser assumes that the query is correct as it stands (in the example above, assumes the user meant [goodnight moom], treat the advertiser’s query interpretation as acceptable.
You would then need to decide separately how promising the ad or landing page are.
2 – Advertiser Responds to a Plausible Correction of Spelling in Query
If the advertiser assumes that the query is misspelled and addresses a corrected version of the query (in the example above, assumes that the user mistyped and meant [goodnight moon], judge for yourself whether this was a good assumption. If you think it was a reasonable assumption, the ad and landing page are treated as if this were the user intent. Don’t modify your scores to account for the spelling correction, and don’t use the Secondary Interpretation of Query flag.
3 – Advertiser Responds to a Possible but Unlikely Correction of Spelling in Query
If the advertiser assumes a corrected spelling that you think is possible but not very likely, this is a secondary interpretation. An ad or landing page that addresses only a secondary interpretation of the query is given a lower rating than if it had responded to a likely or plausible meaning. The Secondary Interpretation of Query flag must be used. An ad or landing page that responds to a secondary interpretation is generally rated negatively.
4 – Implausible Spelling Correction
If the advertiser’s interpretation of the query is based on a completely unreasonable assumption, treat it as completely wrong and give it a very negative score. The Secondary Interpretation of Query flag is not used in this case.
Continuing with the previous [goodnight moom] example, both query interpretations are reasonable. The only way to know this is to research the query and analyze how the advertiser interprets it.
Queries for which a Reasonable Ad is Impossible
Sometimes a query is either so hard to interpret or so non-commercial in nature that no ad will be a good match. Be careful in these cases—rate the ad and landing page according to how well they actually respond to the query, and do not worry about how hard it would be to show an appropriate ad for that query.
Do not give an ad positive ratings if a better ad for the query cannot be determined or if it seems like it was a good try. Rate it positively only if it addresses the query intent. If the query intent cannot be determined, the ad must be rated negatively. For example, a query of [www] or [when did] is not complete enough to serve a proper ad.
Unrateable Queries
In some rare cases, a query may appear that is the result of an error in how the task was added to the evaluation system. For example, a query may appear in the incorrect rating language, or a query of jumbled characters may appear that, after research, has