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Resolução Callister Capítulo 3 Engenharia dos Materiais

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b
2
 – c 
 Intercepts in terms of a, b, and c ∞ 
 
1
2
 – 1 
 Reciprocals of intercepts 0 2 – 1 
 Reduction not necessary 
 Enclosure (021 ) 
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 3-50 
 3.43 (a) In the figure below is shown (110) and (111) planes, and, as indicated, their intersection results in a 
 [1 10] , or equivalently, a [11 0] direction. 
 
 
 
 (b) In the figure below is shown (110) and (11 0) planes, and, as indicated, their intersection results in a 
[001], or equivalently, a [001 ] direction. 
 
 
 
 (c) In the figure below is shown (111 ) and (001) planes, and, as indicated, their intersection results in a 
 [1 10] , or equivalently, a [11 0] direction. 
 
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 3-51 
 
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 3-52 
 3.44 (a) The atomic packing of the (100) plane for the FCC crystal structure is called for. An FCC unit 
cell, its (100) plane, and the atomic packing of this plane are indicated below. 
 
 
 
 (b) For this part of the problem we are to show the atomic packing of the (111) plane for the BCC crystal 
structure. A BCC unit cell, its (111) plane, and the atomic packing of this plane are indicated below. 
 
 
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 3-53 
 3.45 (a) The unit cell in Problem 3.20 is body-centered tetragonal. Of the three planes given in the 
problem statement the (100) and (01 0) are equivalent—that is, have the same atomic packing. The atomic packing 
for these two planes as well as the (001) are shown in the figure below. 
 
 
 
 (b) Of the four planes cited in the problem statement, only (101), (011), and (1 01) are equivalent—have 
the same atomic packing. The atomic arrangement of these planes as well as the (110) are presented in the figure 
below. Note: the 0.495 nm dimension for the (110) plane comes from the relationship 
 
(0.35 nm)2 + (0.35 nm)2[ 1] /2 . Likewise, the 0.570 nm dimension for the (101), (011), and (1 01) planes comes 
from 
 
(0.35 nm)2 + (0.45 nm)2[ ]1/2 . 
 
 
 
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 3-54 
 (c) All of the (111), (11 1) , (111 ) , and (1 11 ) planes are equivalent, that is, have the same atomic packing 
as illustrated in the following figure: 
 
 
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 3-55 
 3.46 Unit cells are constructed below from the three crystallographic planes provided in the problem 
statement. 
 
 
 
 (a) This unit cell belongs to the tetragonal system since a = b = 0.40 nm, c = 0.55 nm, and α = β = γ = 90°. 
 (b) This crystal structure would be called body-centered tetragonal since the unit cell has tetragonal 
symmetry, and an atom is located at each of the corners, as well as the cell center. 
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 3-56 
 3.47 The unit cells constructed below show the three crystallographic planes that were provided in the 
problem statement. 
 
 
 
 (a) This unit cell belongs to the orthorhombic crystal system since a = 0.25 nm, b = 0.30 nm, c = 0.20 nm, 
and α = β = γ = 90°. 
 (b) This crystal structure would be called face-centered orthorhombic since the unit cell has orthorhombic 
symmetry, and an atom is located at each of the corners, as well as at each of the face centers. 
 (c) In order to compute its atomic weight, we employ Equation 3.5, with n = 4; thus 
 
 
A = 
ρVC N A
n
 
 
 
=
(18.91 g/cm3) (2.0)(2.5)(3.0) (× 10-24 cm3/unit cell)(6.023 × 10 23 atoms/mol)
4 atoms/unit cell
 
 
= 42.7 g/mol 
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 3-57 
 3.48 This problem asks that we convert (111) and (01 2) planes into the four-index Miller-Bravais 
scheme, (hkil), for hexagonal cells. For (111), h = 1, k = 1, and l = 1, and, from Equation 3.7, the value of i is equal 
to 
 
 i = − (h + k) = − (1 + 1) = − 2 
 
Therefore, the (111) plane becomes (112 1) . 
 Now for the (01 2) plane, h = 0, k = -1, and l = 2, and computation of i using Equation 3.7 leads to 
 
 i = − (h + k) = −[0 + (−1)] = 1 
 
such that (01 2) becomes (01 12) . 
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 3-58 
 3.49 This problem asks for the determination of Bravais-Miller indices for several planes in hexagonal 
unit cells. 
 
 (a) For this plane, intersections with the a1, a2, and z axes are ∞a, –a, and ∞c (the plane parallels both a1 
and z axes). In terms of a and c these intersections are ∞, –1, and ∞, the respective reciprocals of which are 0, –1, 
and 0. This means that 
 h = 0 
 k = –1 
 l = 0 
Now, from Equation 3.7, the value