A maior rede de estudos do Brasil

Grátis
454 pág.
[Khare, R.P.] Fiber Optics and Optoelectronics

Pré-visualização | Página 1 de 50

Fiber Optics and 
Optoelectronics 
 
 
By: Khare, R.P. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oxford University Press 
 
 
 
 
 
 
© 2004 Oxford University Press 
ISBN:  978‐0‐19‐566930‐5 
  v
 
Table of Contents 
 
 
1. Introduction    1 
  1.1 Fiber Optics and Optoelectronics  1 
  1.2 Historical Developments  1 
  1.3 A Fiber‐Optic Communication System  3 
    1.3.1 Information Input  3 
    1.3.2 Transmitter  4 
    1.3.3 Optoelectronic Source  4 
    1.3.4 Channel Couplers  4 
    1.3.5 Fiber‐Optic Information Channel  5 
    1.3.6 Repeater  5 
    1.3.7 Optoelectronic Detector  5 
    1.3.8 Receiver  6 
    1.3.9 Information Output  6 
  1.4 Advantages of Fiber‐Optic Systems  6 
  1.5 Emergence of Fiber Optics as a Key Technology  7 
  1.6 The Role of Fiber Optics Technology  9 
  vi
  1.7 Overview of the Text  10 
  Appendix A1.1: Relative and Absolute Units of Power  12 
  Appendix A1.2: Bandwidth and Channel Capacity  13 
 
Part I. Fiber Optics 
 
2. Ray Propagation in Optical Fibers  16 
  2.1 Introduction  16 
  2.2 Review of Fundamental Laws of Optics  16 
  2.3 Ray Propagation in Step‐Index Fibers  17 
  2.4 Ray Propagation in Graded‐Index Fibers  21 
  2.5 Effect of Material Dispersion  23 
  2.6 The Combined Effect of Multipath and  
  Material Dispersion  27 
  2.7 Calculation of RMS Pulse Width  28 
  Summary  30 
  Multiple Choice Questions  31 
  Review Questions  33 
 
3. Wave Propagation in Planar Waveguides  35 
  3.1 Introduction  35 
  vii
  3.2 Maxwell's Equations  36 
  3.3 Solution in an Inhomogeneous Medium  38 
  3.4 Planar Optical Waveguide  42 
  3.5 TE Modes of a Symmetric Step‐Index Planar Waveguide  45 
  3.6 Power Distribution and Confinement Factor  52 
  Summary  55 
  Multiple Choice Question  56 
  Review Questions  58 
 
4. Wave Propagation in Cylindrical Waveguides  60 
  4.1 Introduction  60 
  4.2 Modal Analysis of an Ideal SI Optical Fiber  60 
  4.3 Fractional Modal Power Distribution  70 
  4.4 Graded‐Index Fibers  73 
  4.5 Limitations of Multimode Fibers  76 
  Summary  77 
  Multiple Choice Questions  78 
  Review Questions  79 
 
5. Single‐Mode Fibers  82 
  viii
  5.1 Introduction  82 
  5.2 Single‐Mode Fibers  82 
  5.3 Characteristic Parameters of SMFs  83 
    5.3.1 Mode Field Diameter  83 
    5.3.2 Fiber Birefringence  86 
  5.4 Dispersion in Single‐Mode Fibers  87 
    5.4.1 Group Velocity Dispersion  87 
    5.4.2 Waveguide Dispersion  89 
    5.4.3 Material Dispersion  93 
    5.4.4 Polarization Mode Dispersion  95 
  5.5 Attenuation in Single‐Mode Fibers  95 
    5.5.1 Loss due to Material Absorption  96 
    5.5.2 Loss due to Scattering  97 
    5.5.3 Bending Losses  98 
    5.5.4 Joint Losses  99 
  5.6 Design of Single‐Mode Fibers  99 
  Summary  102 
  Multiple Choice Questions  103 
  Review Questions  104 
 
  ix
6. Optical Fiber Cables and Connections  106 
  6.1 Introduction  106 
  6.2 Fiber Material Requirements  107 
  6.3 Fiber Fabrication Methods  108 
    6.3.1 Liquid‐Phase (or Melting) Methods  108 
    6.3.2 Vapour‐Phase Deposition Methods  110 
  6.4 Fiber‐Optic Cables  114 
  6.5 Optical Fiber Connections and Related Losses  115 
    6.5.1 Connection Losses due to Extrinsic Parameters  117 
    6.5.2 Connection Losses due to Intrinsic Parameters  122 
  6.6 Fiber Splices  125 
    6.6.1 Fusion Splices  125 
    6.6.2 Mechanical Splices  126 
    6.6.3 Multiple Splices  128 
  6.7 Fiber‐Optic Connectors  129 
    6.7.1 Butt‐Jointed Connectors  129 
    6.7.2 Expanded‐Beam Connectors  130 
    6.7.3 Multifiber Connectors  131 
  6.8 Characterization of Optical Fibers  131 
    6.8.1 Measurement of Optical Attenuation  132 
  x
    6.8.2 Measurement of Dispersion  135 
    6.8.3 Measurement of Numerical Aperture  136 
    6.8.4 Measurement of Refractive Index Profile  137 
    6.8.5 Field Measurements: OTDR  138 
  Summary  139 
  Multiple Choice Questions  140 
  Review Questions  141 
 
Part II. Optoelectronics 
 
7. Optoelectronic Sources  144 
  7.1 Introduction  144 
  7.2 Fundamental Aspects of Semiconductor Physics  145 
    7.2.1 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductors  146 
  7.3 The p‐n Junction  150 
    7.3.1 The p‐n Junction at Equilibrium  150 
    7.3.2 The Forward‐Biased p‐n Junction  153 
    7.3.3 Minority Carrier Lifetime  154 
    7.3.4 Diffusion Length of Minority Carriers  155 
  7.4 Current Densities and Injection Efficiency  157 
  7.5 Injection Luminescence and the Light‐Emitting Diode  158 
  xi
    7.5.1 Spectrum of Injection Luminescence  159 
    7.5.2 Selection of Materials for LEDs  161 
    7.5.3 Internal Quantum Efficiency  162 
    7.5.4 External Quantum Efficiency  162 
  7.6 The Heterojunction  164 
  7.7 LED Designs  166 
    7.7.1 Surface‐Emitting LEDs  166 
    7.7.2 Edge‐Emitting LEDs  167 
    7.7.3 Superluminescent Diodes  168 
  7.8 Modulation Response of an LED  169 
  7.9 Injection Laser Diodes  171 
    7.9.1 Condition for Laser Action  173 
    7.9.2 Laser Modes  176 
    7.9.3 Laser Action in Semiconductors  178 
    7.9.4 Modulation Response of ILDs  181 
    7.9.5 ILD Structures  183 
  7.10 Source‐Fiber Coupling  187 
  Summary  190 
  Multiple Choice Questions  192 
  Review Questions  193 
  xii
  Appendix A7.1: Lambertian Source of Radiation  196 
 
8. Optoelectronic Detectors  197 
  8.1 Introduction  197 
  8.2 The Basic Principle of Optoelectronic Detection  197 
    8.2.1 Optical Absorption Coefficient and 
    Photocurrent  198 
    8.2.2 Quantum Efficiency  199 
    8.2.3 Responsivity  200 
    8.2.4 Long‐Wavelength Cut‐off  200 
  8.3 Types of Photodiodes  202 
    8.3.1 p‐n Photodiode  202 
    8.3.2 p‐i‐n‐Photodiode  204 
    8.3.3 Avalanche Photodiode  205 
  8.4 Photoconducting Detectors  208 
  8.5 Noise Considerations  210 
  Summary  213 
  Multiple Choice Questions  213 
  Review Questions  215 
 
9. Optoelectronic Modulators  216 
  xiii
  9.1 Introduction  216 
  9.2 Review of Basic Principles  217 
    9.2.1 Optical Polarization  217 
    9.2.2 Birefringence  219 
    9.2.3 Retardation Plates  223 
  9.3 Electro‐Optic Modulators  225 
    9.3.1 Electro‐Optic Effect  225 
    9.3.2 Longitudinal Electro‐Optic Modulator  225 
    9.3.3 Transverse Electro‐Optic Modulator  232 
  9.4 Acousto‐Optic Modulators  234 
    9.4.1 Acousto‐Optic Effect  234 
    9.4.2 Raman‐Nath Modulator  235 
    9.4.3 Bragg Modulator  237 
  9.5 Application Areas of Optoelectronic Modulators  238 
  Summary  239 
  Multiple Choice Questions  241 
  Review Questions  242 
 
10. Optical Amplifiers  244 
  10.1 Introduction  244 
  xiv
  10.2 Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers  245 
    10.2.1 Basic Configuration  245 
    10.2.2 Optical Gain  246 
    10.2.3 Effect of Optical Reflections  249 
    10.2.4 Limitations  250 
  10.3 Erbium‐Doped Fiber Amplifiers  251 
    10.3.1 Operating Principle of EDFA  252 
    10.3.2 A Simplified Model of an EDFA  254 
  10.4 Fiber Raman Amplifiers  259 
  10.5 Application Areas of Optical Amplifiers  262 
  Summary  264 
  Multiple Choice Questions  265 
  Review Questions  266 
 
Part III. Applications 
 
11. Wavelength‐Division Multiplexing  269 
  11.1 Introduction  269 
  11.2 The Concepts of WDM and DWDM  270 
  11.3 Passive Components  272 
  xv
    11.3.1 Couplers  272 
    11.3.2 Multiplexers and Demultiplexers  276 
  11.4 Active Components  284 
    11.4.1 Tunable Sources  284 
    11.4.2 Tunable Filters  284 
  Summary  287 
  Multiple Choice Questions  288 
  Review Questions  289 
 
12. Fiber‐Optic Communication Systems  290 
  12.1 Introduction  290 
  12.2 System Design Considerations for Point‐to‐Point Links  291 
    12.2.1 Digital Systems  291 
    12.2.2 Analog Systems  297 
  12.3 System Architectures

Crie agora seu perfil grátis para visualizar sem restrições.